9/20/2020 – Welcome to our Weekly Specials, something we try to post each Sunday

The grade of fish has been slowly picking up on the long range. The Rooster has been getting some of the bigger grade bluefin on flyline, as opposed to just kite fishing. 2/0 hooks on the bigger sardines with 60lb line works best. The dorado have gotten bigger down south with many in the 20-40lb range which is a big step up from what was been caught a couple of weeks ago. The water has warmed up so there are even occasional wahoo being caught on the kelps. Farther south the 8 day trips have been hooking into a good grade of wahoo and yellowfin so it looks to be a good start to the longer range season. Once more of the 8-10 days go out we will see how the fishing goes, but so far everything is all set for a great season. Bait fishing recommendation are the same as the last few weeks. #4-2 circle hooks or #2 J hooks have been working well for the schoolie fish.

If you’ve got pictures of some of your catches with our gear feel free to send us some pictures either to me at sergey@charkbait.com or Mark at information-1@charkbait.com

If you have any suggestions, complaints, questions or comments about the website please feel free to email me at: sergey@charkbait.com or give me a call at the shop.

As always, thank you for visiting our Weekly Specials and hope to see you at the shop!

Sincerely,
Sergey Smith

Esca Esca Light Lures Great For All Kinds of Bottom Fishing
And Deep Water Applications
Buy 2 Get 1 Free Esca Shrimp Lure Pack

I first came across this product at ICAST several years ago. I was very much interested, but at that point there was no way for me to bring the piece into this country. They’re based in Norway, and it would have been a pain in the keester to import ’em. I’ve been following them ever since, and fishing the sample they provided me. They also had some growing to do, earn their USA patent… We are now pleased to be able to offer this unique product to our clients. The Esca fish attractor utilizes light and electro-magnetic influences to attract gamefish. It can improve the performance of all lures, imitates natures own lure lights, and adds life to lures and bait. While the piece can be used as a lure, it truly shines best by treating it as an attractor. I wrote this back around 2007, and through 2010 we saw this product grow in popularity. But, then something happened. Their USA manager disappeared, did not come to the ICAST shows for years, we could not make contact, and people kept calling asking about the esca lights, if we had any…  I’ll cut to the chase, we found ’em, we’ve got ’em, and you’d do well to grab some.*

There are four different styles/types of Esca attractors. The devices emit either green or blue light, and that light is either a constant fade or blinking/strobe. They are powered by saltwater itself, and will work for up to 100 hours of fishing time – no batteries involved. The best use for the Esca device is to use them as an add-on to your existing lures. They have proven very successful for folks targeting swordfish, all types of deeper water rockfish, and most recently billfish. (They have been used in several tournaments for great effect). The Esca replicates the wavelength, intensity and frequency of light emitted by different types of fish and plankton – the manufacturer refers to this as the “pulse of life!” They also create an electromagnetic field that triggers the hunting instincts in fish. Fish will bite, and bite harder! The Esca will improve the visibility of your lures and tackle, improving your odds at getting bit.

Esca attractors weigh 7 grams. They can be used by themselves as a small jig, but they are really best used together with spinners, jigs, iron, and bait. You can rig them inside soft bodied squid skirts, inline, with deep diving lures and with trolling lures.

Rigged Super Smoker Trolling Lures Rigged with 400lb Cable
Large Stainles Tandem Hook
13 Oz Weight
Comes with Lure Bag
Heavy Duty Wahoo Killers

Wahoo, Tuna and more…

 1″ x 11″ 9 oz head

The Super Smoker is a five hole jet head chromed lure made for wahoo. Certainly it will take other species, but for wahoo its a great high speed trolling lure. The lures are rigged in the USA on 400# stainless steel cable with a tandem SS hook rig. They are packaged in a breathable protective pouch to help keep things organized. We stock the lures in their most effective patterns, all well worth dragging behind your boat on on a long range sportfisher.

These lures are versatile for many different species due to the overall size, they work great for high speed trolling and make a nice bubble trail with the jet head design. The rigging is heavy enough for bigger wahoo, marlin and tuna.

4/0 Light Surface Irons Available in 5 Colors
Old School Jig Brought Back

The 4/0 Light hasn’t been around for a long time but it has finally returned. Used 4/0 Light jigs were going for upwards of $60 on the market and there was great demand for one of the best lighter size surface irons on the market. The 4/0 light uses a different mold than some of the heavier versions, so you’ll notice a slightly different shape that Tady knows to be the best version for the surface. They’re only 2.6 oz so you’ll want to use lighter line and a longer rod to cast them out, but once you do they will catch any of the SoCal pelagic species given the right conditions.

Filters Sort results
Color
Weight
Length
Hook Type
Price
Blue & White
2.6 oz
5.75"
Treble
$14.99
Scrambled Egg
2.6 oz
5.75"
Treble
$14.99
Mint & White
2.6 oz
5.75"
Treble
$14.99
Green Sardine
2.6 oz
5.75"
Treble
$14.99
Mint
2.6 oz
5.75"
Treble
$14.99

Starman 112 Original Candy Bar Lures
Large Size Surface Iron

The Candy Bar Starman 112 was an old school large surface iron that had a lot of popularity, Tady acquired Candy Bar around 2006 and continued to produce the lures that made Candybar one of the best jig manufacturers in California. The Starman 112 is a big larger and heavier than the comparable Tady 45, which makes it great for casting with heavier line, 40-50lb. It has a wide sweep action similar to the 45 which is sure to attract the bigger yellowtail on the surface. It’s a bit heavier than most of the larger surface irons so it’s a good idea to do a 10 count after it hits the water to let it sink that way you get a lot more coverage of the water column and more time in the water.

Filters Sort results
Color
Weight
Length
Hook Type
Price
Blue & White
3.2 oz
6.6"
Treble
$10.99
Scrambled Egg
3.2 oz
6.6"
Treble
$10.99
Mint & White
3.2 oz
6.6"
Treble
$10.99
Green Sardine
3.2 oz
6.6"
Treble
$10.99
Mint
3.2 oz
6.6"
Treble
$10.99
Reverse Green & Yellow
3.2 oz
6.6"
Treble
$10.99
Calico Special
3.2 oz
6.6"
Treble
$10.99
Holographic Mint
3.2 oz
6.6"
Treble
$12.99

BG MQ Spinning Reels ICAST 2020 RELEASE Updated Frame Design
Larger Main Gear
FREE SOLID SPOOLING
Available in 5000-10000 Sizes
Other Sizes Coming Soon

The new BG Monocoque body reels continue on the last few years of development from Daiwa, the initial design was seen on the $800 Exist and after a couple of years has finally gotten to the affordable reel market. With the single piece cast aluminum frame, you drastically improve water resistance since there are less ways for water to enter the reel. Along with this improvement you can also stuff a much bigger and more powerful main gear into the reels. In the BG MQ line you can expect a 20-40% bigger gear vs the standard BG reels which greatly improves their performance for saltwater. Along with the changes to the frame we see a newer spool design which features a raised lip which should reduce casting friction and give you an easier time casting braided lines.

These reels are not a replacement but an addition to the BG line, they command a higher price point setting them squarely into the category of the Saltist which is another great saltwater spinning reel. As a comparison between the two, the BG MQ has a bigger main gear and an updated frame design while the Saltist features Daiwa’s proprietary MagSeal technology and corrosion resistant bearings which make the reel overall smoother.

From the Manufacturer:

Daiwa is proud to introduce the next generation of BG spinning reels to saltwater anglers of all stripes, this time with a one-piece Monocoque aluminum body. Light and strong like a Formula One racing car, the reels are lighter and stronger through use of monocoque body technology. In terms of application, the reels are designed for everything from inshore to heavy offshore fishing with models like the BGMQ2500D-H perfect for speckled trout to models like the BGMQ20000 designed to withstand the pressures of fishing giant bluefin tuna.

With the Monocoque design, the reel body serves as a stiff and distortion-proof frame, which is handy and compact at the same time. If offers more rigidity, more stability, and bigger gears. The Water Resistance is superb and Monocoque body offers more power and torque as a result.

The reels also feature an all-aluminum frame and features Digigear technology. Compared to most of the competition, the gears are between 20% to 40% larger. The gears also feature a larger tooth pattern, giving the gears a much longer gear life and durability than competitive reels. Tests reveal a gear life that is one to three times the length of competitive reels.

Duran DFP Surface Irons Precision Machined Aluminum
3.7 Oz Weight
Heavy Duty Treble Hook
Available in Raw & Mint Colors
More Colors Coming Soon

The machined aluminum iron craze has taken off over the last few years, starting out with the Z-Bar irons that we’ve had for a while we have a new addition from Duran Fishing Products who have made some excellent universal clamps for the guys trying to use their smaller reels on their bigger jig sticks.

These new irons are slightly wider, and heavier than the Z-Bar’s with a cutout in the back which gives it a more unique shape. The hips are more offset which should give the jig a more pronounced kick when retrieving. Having a slightly heavier weight will make it easier to cast far, especially for the guys trying to use the larger low profile baitcasting reels.

As mentioned before these are 100% machined aluminum which means every single jig will swim the way it was originally intended to. While sand-cast and other molded techniques have a lot of variation, meaning some jigs may swim great and some may not swim as well the high precision machining of modern mills will guarantee that every jig will swim perfectly, meaning less cost in the long run since you’re not buying a half dozen jigs to figure out 4 of them don’t swim as well as the others.

Crab & Lobster Products Lobster Season Opens October 3rd at 6:00 am High Quality Nets & Accessories Everything You Need for the Lobster Season
In Store Pickup & Shipping Options Available

Promar makes the highest quality and most complete line of crab and lobster gear available on the market. From nets, kits, floats, rope, bait cages down to the gloves you need for pulling the rope they will have you all covered. If you have been looking to get into lobster fishing, this is a great place to start. Our season starts at the same time every year, the Saturday before the first Wednesday of October which only makes sense to the people in Government who make the regulations. For everyone else, it starts at 6 am on the 3rd of October and ends on March 17th 2021.

Before any gear talk, we should first go over some basic precautions and regulations you should watch out for. Every year guys get popped for all kinds of preventable things, and the fines certainly aren’t cheap.

  1. Make absolutely sure you have a valid fishing license (with enhancement stamp in SoCal) and a lobster card. And make sure anyone else on the boat also has them, even if they are not pulling rope or helping you that way. If they so much as touch the steering wheel or hand you a pair of gloves they are aiding you in catching lobster which means they have to have a lobster card as well. Make sure to keep the license and report card on your person while you are fishing or hooping, do not keep it on the dashboard or anywhere else on the boat. Game wardens can and will ticket you if you do not have it on you even if the license and card are just a few feet away. If you have kids under 16 on the boat and they are helping you catch lobster they must also have a lobster card, even though they do not need a personal fishing license. You can get one registered under their name, tied to your license. If they have a report card they are also allowed to be in possession of 7 lobster.
  2. Mark your large floats with your GO ID, which you can find on your lobster report card or fishing license. This is a requirement as of 1 season ago.
  3. Fill out your lobster card correctly before dropping the hoops. You will need the date, location code, gear code and how many lobsters you retained. Notice the date part, once it is past midnight make sure to fill it out again even if you have not moved from the same spot. It is a new day and they consider it as such, I can’t tell you how many guys get a ticket for this. The location codes are located on the print out of the lobster card, so are the gear codes. The different gear codes are for if you are diving, using a flat net or a conical net.
  4. Make sure everyone on the boat with a lobster card has a lobster gauge, it’s important to have one for everyone. They’re cheap and are easy to get so make sure you have one. There are a couple of different gauges we sell, the SoCal gauge with a crab and lobster size and one with a lobster and clam side.
  5. You can only use 5 nets as an individual on a boat, but you can have a total of 10 in possession in case you have another person you are going with. That is 10 total, even if you have 15 people coming along, you can only use a total of 10 nets.
  6. It is a good idea to keep the net out side of the boat on the rail while you are checking the lobsters, if you think one is borderline or is short do not bring it into your boat, toss it back immediately. They do not want any shorts brought into the boat at all, make sure you be careful when bringing the nets into the boat to measure the lobster.
  7. Once you have those done and are getting the lobster, remember that you can only keep 7 lobster in possession. What does that mean? It means you can possess a total of 7 lobster period, whether they are in your fridge or on your boat you can only have a total of 7. It is not a catch limit, it is the total you can personally possess. If you gift the lobsters to someone else then you are no longer in possession, but if that person lives with you put them in a fridge with their name on it because the Department of Fish & Game does not need a warrant to enter a home if they suspect someone of poaching.
  8. Just to reiterate, make sure to follow the rules to the best of your ability, don’t keep shorts, don’t catch more than your limit, and don’t fish in protected zones around Catalina or elsewhere. This is one area where the DFG gives no leeway, they can and will repossess anything and everything that helped someone poach lobster. That includes the boat someone used to catch the lobster, the car they used to drive them to their house and if they really wanted to the house where the lobsters were stored if they think it was a place where poached lobsters were distributed. Unlike every other institution, they need no warrants to search anything and will enforce every rule in the book. Commercially caught spiny lobster bring in $30-40 per pound, which is why there is a great temptation for some to sell them without the proper documentation.
  9. This isn’t a rule, but please release female lobsters especially if you see eggs on them. You can easily spot them before even getting the net in your boat, throw them back because they have a smaller carapace meaning they will almost always be too short when you measure them. If you find a bigger one then you should still throw them back to continue the reproduction cycle of lobsters and prevent them from becoming underpopulated.
  10. And lastly don’t forget to submit your lobster report card within a month of the season ending, the due date is April 30th. There is a non return fee if you do not submit it, and if you do not submit it a couple of seasons in a row they will not allow you to purchase a license or report card next time.
  11. Please click this text to read over the rest of the general guidelines as set by the California Department of Fish & Game

Nets

Unless you’re diving for them, you’ll need some nets to start catching crab and lobster. While commercial boats can use traps, for sports fishing you will need a net that is open so that in case you lose the net the lobsters can crawl back out of it. There are a couple of different types of net, the traditional flat nets and the conical nets.

Flat nets are more traditional and work great, but they do make it a bit harder to catch lobster. They are completely flat so the lobster can come and go, as long as you’ve got bait in it you don’t have to worry too much about them going though. The main difference is when you start to pull the nets, once you start you should not stop since it’s much easier for the lobster to get out. So they work great for shallower spots but not as well all around. They only have one main large ring so they are generally lighter than conical nets also which require a top ring.

Conical nets are a bit newer. Promar initially released the Eclipse series which is a conical net that is collapsible which makes it great for transporting since you can stack them easier. Later on they came out with the Ambush series which has been the go-to for almost all lobster guys ever since. The Ambush is fully rigid and coated so it is more durable than the Eclipse series but does not transport as well. Which is why they can be more expensive for us to ship. The conical nets make it harder for lobster to crawl out, although they still can as per the regulations. When you’re pulling them they will almost always be heavier, but you have less chances of losing lobster on the way.

Ambush NE-107: These are the original 32″ rigid conical nets that started it all, they are great for almost any lobster sizes and are much easier to pull through the water than the larger nets. There’s no issue getting the bigger lobster with these nets, which is one of the concerns guys have when they try to decide between these and the larger 36″ nets. The main thing you will have to pay attention to with these is current, the more current the harder it is to keep them straight. I’ll address this towards the bottom in the rigging section. These nets come in packs of 8. Each net weighs about 5 lbs.

Ambush NE-107XL: Following the success of the 107’s Promar released the XL size to max out the size of the net you can have in California, 36″ is as big as you can go. These are a bit harder to pull through the water due to their larger size but you can put more bait in them and expect to catch more lobster if you leave them out long enough. The XL’s weigh about 6lbs.

Ambush NE-107XLH: These are the newest release and the big boys in their line of Ambush nets. At 36″ and 14lbs each they more than double the weight of the XL’s. This makes it much harder to pull them up, but much easier to drop them exactly on the spot you are aiming for. If current is high these will drop a lot straighter than the rest of the nets due to the sheer weight of them. This makes them perfect for use in deeper water or in high current.

Kits

Once you’ve picked out the nets you want, you will need some rigging to go along with them.

Ambush Series: The Ambush nets come with the 3 point harness and small float attached to the net. So you will need the main line, the large float and a larger bait cage if you don’t want to use the soft pouch at the bottom of the net. Promar makes a complete kit for these nets that I will link down below. It is the NE-103 Pro kit which comes with the large white float, 75 feet of 1/2″ poly line and a glow stick for find your float.

Eclipse Series: The Eclipse kit does not come with the harness so you will need a 4 point snap on harness to attach to the net. Promar makes a kit specifically for the Eclipse nets which comes with the harness, large float, 100ft of 1/4″ line and the small float for the harness. These nets are more often used for crab so they come with the smaller main line, but if you want to use them for lobster I would recommend getting the heavier duty 1/2″ rope that we sell in different lengths.

Deluxe Flat Nets: The flat nets come with the rigging already attached, the only thing you would need is some of the bait cages for convenience. But you can still put bait in the pouch at the bottom like any of the other nets.

Bait Cages

All of the nets come with a small ring at the bottom with a pouch for bait however using a separate bait cage is much more convenient for most people. The offer the small and large wire bait cages which work for most people. The smaller wire cage works great for crab, and the smaller nets while the standard size wire bait cages work for lobster and the larger nets. Since they are square, most people put the bait in beforehand and then stack them in a freezer that way the bait is all ready to go. When they take them out, the bait will slowly thaw out and give a nice scent trail that lasts a while. You will need the plastic bait snaps to attach the cage to the net.

We also stock seal proof PVC bait cages, they are rigid and make it a lot harder for the seals to take the bait. If there are many seals around they can come up and crush the wire bait cages to take the bait out.

Rope

We sell a couple of types of rope and many of the kits or nets come with the rope already. The crab line is 1/4″ diameter and comes in a length of 100 feet, this is a great start for the crabbing and it is all you will need unless you wanted to go a lot deeper. The lobster rope is 1/2″ thick and comes in 75 ft, 200 ft and 300ft lengths which covers you for almost any situation. If you want to be doing Catalina usually the spots are deeper and will require more rope while coast and harbor hooping will require less. In Long Beach harbor generally the spots are 100ft or less in depth.

A very helpful accessory if you will be doing a variety of depths is the rope weights that Promar makes. These are 8 or 12 oz weights that will clip to the end of your rope to make sure you do not have a lot of slack line floating on the surface. The weight will bring the end of the rope down keeping it away from boats and keeping your big floats right above your nets instead of farther away. So in case you have 100 feet of rope and want to hoop at a 50 ft spot, you can clip it on so that your float doesn’t end up 50 feet away, or worse stuck in someones props.

Rigging

No matter which nets, cages, or rope you choose you will need to properly rig your setup to make it easier to use.

If you are dropping your nets in deeper water (150ft+) especially at Catalina you will want to either use the larger Ambush XLH net which is 14 lbs or you will want to add LM Hoop Net Heavies to your other nets in order to increase their weight. You can ziptie them to the outside ring so that you can get a straight drop to the spot you’re targeting, without sufficient weight the current can take your net 50 feet away from the spot you want to be next to. Usually when guys are using the smaller 32″ nets they will add 4 weights to the outside ring, for the larger XL they will add 3 corresponding to the welded steel supports.

For your large float, you will want to face the pointed towards your net that way when it is on the surface it will always face into the current and keep your rope tight. I would recommend using the line weight’s on the opposite side to keep your rope tight and out of the way, it makes for the absolute best setup to work with.

Spotting your float can be tricky that is why you want to use something to mark it. Some people put reflective tape around their float and use a flashlight to spot it, but this can be tricky especially in the middle of the night. You want it to be visible but not so visible as to give away your precious spots to people driving by.

Another way is to use glow sticks or LED sticks to light up the float. If you intend on using the glow sticks you will want to keel your float. To make sure the glow stick is always outside of the water on the top side.

  1. Find the seam and drill a 1/2″ hole a few inches deep about a palms width away from the flat end of your float.
  2. Next you will want to take a 3-4oz egg sinker and hammer it into the hole you made.
  3. After that it is best to use epoxy to fill the hole to make sure your sinker doesn’t fall out.
  4. On the opposite side of the float you should drill a hole that is smaller than your glow stick
  5. Finally put the glow stick in the hole and make sure it is tight so it doesn’t fly out when you’re dropping the nets

With this your glow stick or LED stick will always stay out of the water for you to see. If you want to be a bit more sneaky with it you can tape half of it up to expose less of the light, this will make it harder for guys driving nearby to see it and save your spot.

And the last way I’ve seen guys rig it is using a water activated blinking light, similar to ones they use for swordfish. The water activated lights obviously need to be in water which is a problem since you want the light on the surface to see it. For this method you’ll need some empty Gatorade bottles, all you need to do is half fill them with water and drop your light inside and close the bottle up making sure there’s enough air left for it to float. You can use a clip to attach the bottle to the back side of the rope after the flat side of the large float so that it can move up to the surface next to it.

Tips

For some last minute thoughts, here’s a basic overview of what you should and shouldn’t be doing when you’re trying to get lobster.

It’s important to find a good spot to set up on, a spot with lots of lobster will in theory yield more lobster, but it is not that simple. You will need to pay attention to current conditions on the spot you want to set up on. You always want to be on the up-current side of the structure you are working. The current will push the scent from your bait into the structure to make the lobsters come to you net. If you set up on the down current side of the spot then it makes absolutely no different how many lobster there are or how good your bait is, the lobster will never be able to sense your bait because it is pushed away from the structure by the current.

Another important thing to consider is how close you are to the spot, if there is a lot of current and you’re using a light net the current will move your net as it drops taking it further away from the structure. Pay close attention to where your boat is in relation to the structure and make sure your net is sufficiently heavy to land in the exact spot you want it to.

Rock piles and open structure work well regardless of the current direction as long as you set up on the right side of it, but other spots such as ship wrecks, containers, lost fridges and so on may only work when the current direction is going a certain way. If the lobsters are in ship wreck on its side, setting up on the up current side of the hull will do you no good because your bait is not penetrating the hull of the boat.

It is obvious that the more nets and scent trails there are on a single spot the less lobster per net you will get. If 3 boats come along and drop 30 nets on the big spot you want to work it probably is not worth it for you to try it. For that reason you want to pick times and days of less activity if you are going for well known spots, or find smaller spots that are less well known.

If you find a good small spot that produces lobster every time you go, DO NOT TELL PEOPLE ABOUT IT. If you do, I can guarantee you that people will post about it everywhere and the next day there will no longer be anything left of it. Keep it discrete, if you get your limit in one drop consider driving around and making a few more drops elsewhere just don’t keep any more lobster. This will make it less obvious to the boats around you which spots you are getting lobster on. If you made your drop on it, go somewhere else and come back in 30-45 minutes, don’t just hang around waiting for lobsters to crawl in, use the opportunity to get some other fishing done if you want. If someone tells you about their spot, don’t tell anyone else about it. If you use a small headlamp when you’re measuring lobster at night be discrete about how you use it. If other boats at night see a light turning on and off over and over they will know that you are obviously measuring lobster.

What bait should I use?

There are many popular types of bait to use for lobster, mackerel seems to be a good balance for affordability and effectiveness. Fresh bait is better than frozen bait but it will not last as long in the water so you should limit it to 15-20 minute drops, and with frozen you can drop for 30 minutes of even more. Many people freeze a stack of bait cages with bait that way they have it all ready. Once you take it out you can use a screwdriver to stab it a few times and let it melt a bit so you can get a good scent trail.

Be very careful when using SALMON or BONITO as bait and always keep your receipts on your person after you purchase it. Salmon heads or carcass are very popular for use as bait since they are cheap and last a while. Ocean Salmon are a game fish and have a season from May 1st through November 8th, they have a bag limit of 2 and a minimum size of 20 inches. Meaning if you do not keep your receipt you will have no way of proving that you did not catch the salmon. If you have more than 2 heads in your bait cages, they can ticket you for being both under the size limit and being over the bag limit. For bonito the limit is 10 for over 24″ and 5 if they are under 24″, if you use fillets they are automatically counted as individual fish and have to be over 24″ so it is easy to go over the limit, make sure to have your receipt on you if you buy it at a market.

Male vs Female Lobsters:

Male lobsters will generally have a much larger carapace or head than a female lobster, this makes them good to keep because you will have to measure the carapace using a your lobster gauge to make sure it is big enough to keep.

Female lobsters will have a smaller carapace and a larger tail, they will also have much larger fins and swimmersets to hold the eggs and be able to crawl with them. They also have an extra set of swimmersets used to carry the eggs.

It is very important to be able to identify the lobsters easily, if you see a female lobster in your net after you pull it up, throw it back! Since the carapace of the females are smaller the odds are good that it will not be big enough to keep based on the gauge measurements. The same size male lobster may be a keeper but the females are almost always not. If you see a large female lobster with eggs in your net, throw it back!  Just because it is a keeper size does not mean you should keep it. They can lay hundreds of thousands of eggs which can lead to thousands of new lobsters added to the population which we as fishermen and everyone else should want to preserve since they take a long time to grow. There are plenty of lobster out there, it is not that difficult to get them so there is no reason why anyone should keep a big breeder lobster.

Measuring Lobster: To determine whether the lobster you’ve just caught is large enough to keep, you must measure the length of the body shell, or carapace, along the midline from the rear edge of the eye socket (between the horns) to the rear edge of the carapace with a lobster gauge. This straight-line measurement should be a minimum of 3¼ inches. The carapace of a legal-sized lobster is larger than or equal to the gauge’s cutout. If the lobster is too small, it should immediately be released back into the water. Undersized lobster should never be retained by divers or hoop netters or placed in any type of receiver.

SHOPPING CART

close